Framing the Crimes of Colonialism: Critical Images of Aboriginal Art and Law

FRAMING CRIME: CULTURAL CRIMINOLOGY AND THE IMAGE, pp. 115-137, K. Hayward, M. Presdee, eds., Routledge, 2010

UNSW Law Research Paper No. 2011-5

23 Pages Posted: 16 Jan 2011 Last revised: 15 Dec 2011

See all articles by Chris Cunneen

Chris Cunneen

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney; University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences; James Cook University - Cairns Campus

Date Written: January 9, 2011

Abstract

This chapter considers images of crime and law, and what we, through the lens of cultural criminology, might learn of the nature and experiences of crime represented through the image. The images considered in this chapter are particular: Australian Aboriginal art. These artworks function on two levels, as an expression of Aboriginal law and, more extensively, as a critique of the imposed colonial law. Both in traditional and contemporary society, Aboriginal art is a powerful medium for expressing Aboriginal law and culture.

Keywords: Cultural Criminology, Australian Aboriginal Art

Suggested Citation

Cunneen, Chris, Framing the Crimes of Colonialism: Critical Images of Aboriginal Art and Law (January 9, 2011). FRAMING CRIME: CULTURAL CRIMINOLOGY AND THE IMAGE, pp. 115-137, K. Hayward, M. Presdee, eds., Routledge, 2010; UNSW Law Research Paper No. 2011-5. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1739383

Chris Cunneen (Contact Author)

Jumbunna Institute for Indigenous Education and Research,University of Technology Sydney ( email )

15 Broadway, Ultimo
PO Box 123
Sydney, NSW 2007
Australia

University of New South Wales, School of Social Sciences ( email )

Kensington, New South Wales 2052
Australia

James Cook University - Cairns Campus ( email )

PO Box 6811
Cairns, Queensland 4870
Australia

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
245
Abstract Views
1,017
rank
125,633
PlumX Metrics