The Importance of Self: Developing Students' Self Efficacy through Work Integrated Learning

The International Journal of Learning, Vol. 17, No. 10, pp. 479-496, 2010

5 Pages Posted: 17 Jan 2011

See all articles by Brett Freudenberg

Brett Freudenberg

Griffith University - Griffith Business School; Griffith University - Griffith Law School

Craig Cameron

Griffith University

Mark Brimble

Griffith University - School of Accounting, Banking and Finance - Nathan and Logan Campuses; Centre for Financial Independence and Education

Date Written: January 16, 2011

Abstract

Studies have found that the use of profesionals and industry representatives can enhance students' confidence and their self-belief (Subramaniam & Freudenberg, 2007). Self-efficacy is an important measure of an individual's capacity to cope with learning and performing, whether at university or in the workplace. Bandura's social cognitive theory defines self-efficacy as 'beliefs in one's capabilities to organize and execute the courses of action required to produce given attainments' (Bandura, 1997, p.3). The importance of a person’s efficacy cannot be underestimated as it can influence the courses of action they choose to pursue as well as how much effort they will expend in given situations.

Prior studies have found that a student's self-efficacy is correlated with various outcomes including self-regulatory behaviour (such as awareness of learning approach used and time taken), motivation constructs, and academic performance (Collins, 1982; Zimmermann, et al., 1992; Pajares,1994; Keef and Roush,1997; Christensen, Fogarty and Wallace, 2002). In terms of improving and developing self-efficacy, studies indicate that self-efficacy can be enhanced in various ways, which includes work integrated learning (WIL) (Tucker & McCarthy, 2001; Subramaniam & Freudenberg, 2007). This paper reports how a Professional Development Program (PDP) with WIL characteristics was developed and integrated into an undergraduate degree to allow for the development of students' self-efficacy through mastery experiences, modelling, social persuasion and physiological states. This paper details the procedures that have been developed, and provides preliminary evidence on the impact of the PDP in the 1st year of delivery and compares this with a control group from another campus without this program. We argue that the WIL program in an undergraduate degree in partnership with industry has assisted students in gaining a greater understanding of 'self' and improved their self-efficacy.

Keywords: Self Efficacy, Work Integrated Learning, Motivation, Learning, Industry, Business, Accounting

JEL Classification: I20

Suggested Citation

Freudenberg, Brett and Cameron, Craig and Brimble, Mark, The Importance of Self: Developing Students' Self Efficacy through Work Integrated Learning (January 16, 2011). The International Journal of Learning, Vol. 17, No. 10, pp. 479-496, 2010, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1742089

Brett Freudenberg (Contact Author)

Griffith University - Griffith Business School ( email )

Brisbane, Queensland 4111
Australia

Griffith University - Griffith Law School ( email )

Nathan Campus, GU
Nathan 4111
Australia

Craig Cameron

Griffith University ( email )

Brisbane, Queensland 4111
Australia
55587623 (Phone)

Mark Brimble

Griffith University - School of Accounting, Banking and Finance - Nathan and Logan Campuses ( email )

University Drive
Logan, Queensland 4131
Australia
(07) 373 55311 (Phone)

Centre for Financial Independence and Education ( email )

Brisbane, Queensland 4111
Australia

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