Of Labor Inspectors and Judges: Chilean Labor Law Enforcement after Pinochet (And What the United States Can Do to Help)

Saint Louis University Law Journal, Vol. 54, p. 497, 2010

27 Pages Posted: 23 Jan 2011

Date Written: January 21, 2011

Abstract

The study of labor law enforcement in Latin America and the Caribbean has become increasingly important among academic researchers not insignificantly because many of the region's countries have free trade agreements (PTA) with the United States that incorporate a labor clause, or "side agreement" in the case of the North America Free Trade Agreement (NAFTA), calling for each party to enforce its national labor laws, broadly defined to include both collective and individual rights. PTAs, except NAPTA, include further commitments in favor of promoting internationally recognized core labor rights. The stress on national enforcement in all of these FTAs, although criticized by some labor activists for being inadequate and ineffective, has spurred modest but important institutional modernization of some of the region's labor law enforcement bodies with some improvements in the enforcement of the labor laws.

Keywords: Labor Inspection, Latin America, Chile, Labor Courts, Comparative Labor Law

JEL Classification: K10, K31

Suggested Citation

Rosado Marzán, César F., Of Labor Inspectors and Judges: Chilean Labor Law Enforcement after Pinochet (And What the United States Can Do to Help) (January 21, 2011). Saint Louis University Law Journal, Vol. 54, p. 497, 2010, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1745033

César F. Rosado Marzán (Contact Author)

University of Iowa College of Law ( email )

Melrose and Byington
Iowa City, IA 52242
United States

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