Shrinking Classroom Age Variance Raises Student Achievement: Evidence from Developing Countries

47 Pages Posted: 20 Apr 2016

See all articles by Liang Choon Wang

Liang Choon Wang

Monash University - Department of Economics

Date Written: January 1, 2011

Abstract

Large classroom variance of student age is prevalent in developing countries, where achievement tends to be low. This paper investigates whether increased classroom age variance adversely affects mathematics and science achievement. Using exogenous variation in the variance of student age in ability-mixing schools, the author finds robust negative effects of classroom age variance on fourth graders' achievement in developing countries. A simulation demonstrates that re-grouping students by age in the sample can improve math and science test scores by roughly 0.1 standard deviations. According to past estimates for the United States, this effect size is similar to that of raising expenditures per student by 26 percent.

Keywords: Tertiary Education, Educational Sciences, Youth and Governance, Secondary Education, Scientific Research & Science Parks

Suggested Citation

Wang, Liang Choon, Shrinking Classroom Age Variance Raises Student Achievement: Evidence from Developing Countries (January 1, 2011). World Bank Policy Research Working Paper No. 5527, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1747430

Liang Choon Wang (Contact Author)

Monash University - Department of Economics ( email )

Wellington Road
Clayton, Victoria
Australia

HOME PAGE: http://sites.google.com/site/liangchoonwang/

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
50
Abstract Views
494
PlumX Metrics