Union Citizenship: Conceptions, Conditions and Preconditions - Introduction to Special Issue on Union Citizenship

Law and Philosophy, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 233-37, 2001

3 Pages Posted: 30 Jan 2011

Date Written: 2001

Abstract

Union citizenship, first introduced in the Maastricht Treaty, confers a broad range of rights on national of the member states, including rights of movement, political rights, protection in non-EU states, and rights to petition. The relationship to national citizenship was clarified in the Treaty of Amsterdam: Union Citizenship is meant to supplement, not supplant, national citizenship. The European Union Charter of Fundamental Rights, signed and proclaimed in Nice December 2000, laid out the range of civil, political, economic and social rights conferred both to Union Citizens and other persons resident in the EU.

Even after these multiple rounds of clarification, Union citizenship raises important questions, opportunities and challenges regarding the future development of the European Union. Indeed, the significance of Union citizenship itself is contested: If Union citizenship the answer, what is the question?

Keywords: EU, citizenship, Maastricht Treaty, Amsterdam Treaty, the Charter of Fundamental Rights

Suggested Citation

Follesdal, Andreas, Union Citizenship: Conceptions, Conditions and Preconditions - Introduction to Special Issue on Union Citizenship (2001). Law and Philosophy, Vol. 20, No. 3, pp. 233-37, 2001. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1751010

Andreas Follesdal (Contact Author)

Pluricourts ( email )

P.O. Box 6706
St. Olavs plass 5
0130 Oslo
Norway

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