The Unobtrusive Knowledge Test: Validity and Impact of Stereotype Threat

Equal Opportunities International, Vol. 28, No. 7, 2009

29 Pages Posted: 13 Feb 2011

See all articles by Daniel E. Martin

Daniel E. Martin

California State University, East Bay

Carol F. Moore

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Carol Hedgspeth

Morgan State University

Date Written: October 23, 2009

Abstract

Purpose – The purpose of this paper is to validate the unobtrusive knowledge test (UKT) in a minority population, and examine its potential for limiting stereotype threat.

Design/methodology/approach – Study One: (convergent validity): UKT and Wonderlic Personnel Test (WPT) scores were correlated for 131 students. Study Two: (stereotype threat) 202 minority students were placed into one of four groups based on whether or not they were given instructions to elicit stereotype threat, and whether they took the Excellence scale of the UKT or the WPT.

Findings – Correlations provided evidence of convergent validity between the Excellence subscale of the UKT and the WPT. The stereotype threat study was inconclusive, with no differences being seen in the threat/non-threat conditions for the WPT, and higher scores in the threat condition than the non-threat condition for the UKT.

Research limitations/implications – Unreliability of some scales and low correlations of others with the WPT, lessened the overall UKT's convergent validity.

Practical implications – The need to develop measures of intelligence not subject to adverse impact is clear, and the results of the current research provide justification for further research establishing the properties of the UKT as a selection tool.

Originality/value – This paper offers new evidence of the usefulness of the UKT as a measure of cognitive ability for minority populations, and raises questions about the impact of stereotype threat on the UKT test.

Suggested Citation

Martin, Daniel E. and Moore, Carol F. and Hedgspeth, Carol, The Unobtrusive Knowledge Test: Validity and Impact of Stereotype Threat (October 23, 2009). Equal Opportunities International, Vol. 28, No. 7, 2009, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1755570

Daniel E. Martin (Contact Author)

California State University, East Bay ( email )

25800 Carlos Bee Boulevard
Hayward, CA 94542
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.csueastbay.edu

Carol F. Moore

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Carol Hedgspeth

Morgan State University ( email )

1700 E. Cold Spring Ln
Baltimore, MD 21251
United States

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