Identifying and Measuring Chronic Poverty: Beyond Monetary Measures

36 Pages Posted: 10 Feb 2011

See all articles by David Hulme

David Hulme

University of Manchester - Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM)

Andrew McKay

University of Bath - Department of Economics; University of Nottingham - Centre for Research on Economic Development and International Trade (CREDIT)

Date Written: 2005

Abstract

Despite the renewed commitment over the past 15 years to poverty reduction as the core objective of international development discourses and policies, progress to this end remains disappointing. This is particularly evident in the extent to which the world is off track to achieve most of the Millennium Development Goals, globally and in most regions and countries (UNDP 2003; UN Statistics Division 2004). This inadequate progress raises important questions about the policies and strategies (centred around economic growth and human development) that have been adopted to achieve poverty reduction, as well as about key international issues including aid, debt, trade and conflict reduction. It also raises important questions about our very conception and understanding of poverty. While perspectives on poverty have evolved significantly over this period, with widespread acceptance of the multidimensional nature of poverty, and of the importance of considering the depth and severity of poverty, there has been slower progress in recognising and responding to the persistence of poverty over time (Clark and Hulme 2005); in other words, the phenomenon of chronic poverty.

Keywords: concepts, assets, policy, livelihoods, multidimensional poverty, methodology, multidimensional poverty measurement

Suggested Citation

Hulme, David and McKay, Andrew, Identifying and Measuring Chronic Poverty: Beyond Monetary Measures (2005). Chronic Poverty Research Centre Working Paper No. 30. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1756793 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1756793

David Hulme (Contact Author)

University of Manchester - Institute for Development Policy and Management (IDPM) ( email )

Manchester M13 9GH
United Kingdom

Andrew McKay

University of Bath - Department of Economics ( email )

Claverton Down
Bath, BA2 7AY
United Kingdom

University of Nottingham - Centre for Research on Economic Development and International Trade (CREDIT) ( email )

School of Economics
Nottingham, NG7 2RD
United Kingdom

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