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Vietnam and Public International Law

Vanderbilt International Law Review, Vol. 2, No. 100, 1969

Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 11-29

7 Pages Posted: 21 Feb 2011  

Date Written: 1969

Abstract

With each international crisis inevitably come the self­-styled "realists" proclaiming that there is no such thing as public international law. The Vietnam war is no exception, although here, due to the unusual complexity of the facts and the controversy over the applicable rules of international law, many of the published replies to the "realist's" positions have themselves been insubstantial and unconvincing. Let us look first, briefly, at the arguments of one of the realists, and then, with equal brevity, at some of the counterclaims. The remainder of this comment will be addressed to the larger issues involved and some suggested avenues for coping with the implementation of the ideal of world peace through world law.

Keywords: Vietnam, International Law, Public International Law, Realism

JEL Classification: K10, K19, K30, K33

Suggested Citation

D'Amato, Anthony, Vietnam and Public International Law (1969). Vanderbilt International Law Review, Vol. 2, No. 100, 1969; Northwestern Public Law Research Paper No. 11-29. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1763952 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1763952

Anthony D'Amato (Contact Author)

Northwestern University - Pritzker School of Law ( email )

375 E. Chicago Ave
Chicago, IL 60611
United States

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