An Environmental Justice Framework for Indigenous Tourism

Journal of Environmental Philosophy, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 75-92, 2010

18 Pages Posted: 11 Mar 2011 Last revised: 8 Aug 2013

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

Environmental tourism is a growing practice in indigenous communities worldwide. As members of indigenous communities, what environmental justice framework should we use to evaluate these practices? I argue that, while some of the most relevant and commonly discussed norms are fair compensation and participative justice, we should also follow Robert Figueroa’s claim that “recognition justice” is relevant for environmental justice. I claim that from Figueroa’s analysis there is a “norm of direct participation,” which requires all environmental tourism practices to feature a forum for meaningful representation and consideration. This claim motivates a distinction between practices that should be termed “mutually advantageous exploitation” and those that should be termed “environmental coalition development.” We need to ask ourselves whether we should continue to tolerate mutually advantageous exploitation and how we can increase the number of practices that develop coalitions.

Keywords: Environmental Justice, Indigenous Tourism, Recognition Justice, Reality Tourism, Justice Tourism, Direct Participation

Suggested Citation

Whyte, Kyle, An Environmental Justice Framework for Indigenous Tourism (2010). Journal of Environmental Philosophy, Vol. 7, No. 2, pp. 75-92, 2010 , Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1782902

Kyle Whyte (Contact Author)

University of Michigan ( email )

440 Church Street
Dana Building
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
United States

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