Allying to Kill: Terrorist Intergroup Cooperation and the Consequences for Lethality

58 Pages Posted: 12 Jun 2011 Last revised: 9 Mar 2012

See all articles by Michael C. Horowitz

Michael C. Horowitz

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Political Science

Philip B.K. Potter

University of Virginia - Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics

Date Written: November 21, 2011

Abstract

In contrast to the conventional wisdom that most terrorist groups act independently, we demonstrate that alliances between terrorist groups occur frequently and have a significant positive impact on the capabilities of those who forge links. Our evidence, drawn from both case studies and statistical analysis, shows that it is not just the number of ties a terrorist group has to others in the terrorist universe, but the quality of those ties, that affects future behavior. The implication is that terrorism research and counterterrorism policy should assess terrorist organizations in the broader context of their interrelationships and alliances rather than in isolation.

Keywords: Terrorism, Terrorist alliances, counter terrorism, networks

Suggested Citation

Horowitz, Michael C. and Potter, Philip B.K., Allying to Kill: Terrorist Intergroup Cooperation and the Consequences for Lethality (November 21, 2011). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1787599 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1787599

Michael C. Horowitz (Contact Author)

University of Pennsylvania - Department of Political Science ( email )

Stiteler Hall
Philadelphia, PA 19104
United States

Philip B.K. Potter

University of Virginia - Woodrow Wilson Department of Politics ( email )

PO Box 400787
University of Virginia
Charlottesville, VA 22904
United States

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