Regulatory Reform in the States: Lessons from New Jersey

35 Pages Posted: 5 Apr 2011

See all articles by Stuart Shapiro

Stuart Shapiro

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy

Debra Borie-Holtz

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey

Date Written: March 24, 2011

Abstract

While numerous examinations of the rule-making process have occurred at the federal level, there are fewer studies about the effects of the proceduralization of the rule-making process on state regulations. Our examination focuses on regulations promulgated in New Jersey, both before and after major procedural changes enacted in the state in 2001. We collected data on 1,707 regulations on a wide array of variables from the type of rule-making, rule length, degree of public comment and agency response to comments. We also examined aggregate data on all final rules issued from 1998 to 2007. On the whole, we found that agencies are largely immune to the procedural requirements of the state’s regulatory process. Agencies march on, writing regulations regardless of their political or procedural environment.

Keywords: regulation, participation, cost-benefit analysis, administrative law

JEL Classification: K20, K23, D73

Suggested Citation

Shapiro, Stuart and Borie-Holtz, Debra, Regulatory Reform in the States: Lessons from New Jersey (March 24, 2011). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1794172 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1794172

Stuart Shapiro (Contact Author)

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Edward J. Bloustein School of Planning and Public Policy ( email )

New Brunswick, NJ 08901
United States

Debra Borie-Holtz

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey ( email )

311 North 5th Street
New Brunswick, NJ 08854
United States

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