Diversity and Specialisation in Cities: Why, Where and When Does it Matter?

Center for Economic Performance Working Paper No. 433

29 Pages Posted: 10 Oct 1999

See all articles by Gilles Duranton

Gilles Duranton

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Geography and Environment; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Diego Puga

IMDEA Social Sciences; University of Toronto - Department of Economics; Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

Date Written: July 1999

Abstract

Why are some cities specialised and others diversified? What are the advantages and disadvantages of urban specialisation and diversity? To what extent does the structure of cities, and the activities of firms and people in them, change over time? How does the sectoral composition of cities influence their evolution? To answer these and related questions, we first distil some key stylised facts from the empirical literature on cities and the composition of their activities. We then turn to a review of different theories looking at such issues, and study the extent to which these theories contribute to the understanding of the empirical regularities.

JEL Classification: R30, O31, D83

Suggested Citation

Duranton, Gilles and Puga, Diego, Diversity and Specialisation in Cities: Why, Where and When Does it Matter? (July 1999). Center for Economic Performance Working Paper No. 433, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=180868 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.180868

Gilles Duranton (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Geography and Environment ( email )

Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom
+44 20 7955 7604 (Phone)
+44 20 7955 7412 (Fax)

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

Diego Puga

IMDEA Social Sciences ( email )

Calle Veláquez 76
Madrid, 28001
Spain

University of Toronto - Department of Economics ( email )

150 St. George Street
Toronto, Ontario M5S 3G7
Canada
416-978-4375 (Phone)
416-978-6713 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://dpuga.economics.utoronto.ca/

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Downloads
190
Abstract Views
1,471
rank
219,112
PlumX Metrics