Biotechnology Inventions: What Can We Learn from Patents?

Wellesley College Working Paper

27 Pages Posted: 11 Oct 1999

See all articles by Daniel K. N. Johnson

Daniel K. N. Johnson

Colorado College - Department of Economics and Business

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: July 1999

Abstract

This paper explores several characteristics of patents in the biotechnology field, comparing and contrasting them to patents in other fields of research. We find that biotechnology patents face a longer lag between application and grant date, and their secrecy would be heavily affected if legislation were to permit publication 18 months after application. They are highly concentrated geographically, as well as in industrial origin, and are used most heavily in the health sector, but have a wider spread in use than in origin. They use many more (and much more recent) references than the average patent, with a special weight on academic or scientific literature, foreign patents, and a tight circle of research fields. While they are not cited frequently on average, their use as germplasm is rising. Future research should focus on the questions that have been uncovered.

JEL Classification: Q16, O31, O34

Suggested Citation

Johnson, Daniel Kent Neil, Biotechnology Inventions: What Can We Learn from Patents? (July 1999). Wellesley College Working Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=181009 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.181009

Daniel Kent Neil Johnson (Contact Author)

Colorado College - Department of Economics and Business ( email )

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United States
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719-389-6927 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://faculty1.coloradocollege.edu/~djohnson

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