Is the World Flat? Or Do Countries Still Matter?

32 Pages Posted: 25 Apr 2011

See all articles by Alberto Chong

Alberto Chong

University of Ottawa

Mark Gradstein

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev - Department of Economics; CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR); World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)

Date Written: December 2006

Abstract

This paper revisits the effects of a country`s institutional framework on individual firms` behavior, in particular focusing on their propensity to comply with legal rules. The theoretical model presented here suggests that these effects may be of paramount significance contrary to the recently popularized paradigm arguing that differences across countries have ceased to matter much. This papers empirical strategy consists of explaining the variation in measures of non-compliance with legal rules and employs a rich dataset based on thousands of firms from dozens of countries. We find that most of the variation emanates from country-wide differences in institutional quality, although some firm characteristics play a role as well. Our conclusion is that countries still matter in providing institutional infrastructure, which determines to a large extent the context within which firms operate.

Suggested Citation

Chong, Alberto and Gradstein, Mark, Is the World Flat? Or Do Countries Still Matter? (December 2006). IDB Working Paper No. 488, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1820061 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1820061

Alberto Chong (Contact Author)

University of Ottawa ( email )

2292 Edwin Crescent
Ottawa, Ontario K2C 1H7
Canada

Mark Gradstein

Ben-Gurion University of the Negev - Department of Economics ( email )

Beer-Sheva 84105
Israel
+97 2 8647 2288 (Phone)
+97 2 8647 2941 (Fax)

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

HOME PAGE: http://www.cesifo.de

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

London
United Kingdom

World Bank - Development Research Group (DECRG)

1818 H. Street, N.W.
MSN3-311
Washington, DC 20433
United States

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