Genetic Testing and Microarray Technologies

GENES, SOCIETY AND THE FUTURE, Vol. I, Part 5, Human Genome Research Project, Dunedin, NZ, 2007

21 Pages Posted: 3 May 2011

See all articles by Genevieve Matthews

Genevieve Matthews

Law Foundation-sponsored Human Genome Research Project

Mark Henaghan

University of Otago; University of Otago

Date Written: May 1, 2011

Abstract

The use of microarrays allows many genetic tests to be done simultaneously on one genetic sample and changes (mutations) to be found that are currently not detected. Microarrays are being used predominantly in the research sector. There has been some movement into the clinical testing and diagnostics arena internationally, but its eventual utility in clinical screening remains to be seen. The diagnostic aspect of microarrays has been enthusiastically reported in the clinical and scientific literature and remains one of the most likely uses of the technology as the cost comes down.

There is still a technology block regarding the use of microarrays with PGD for aneuploidy screening in the form of whole genome amplification. If this problem can be overcome, microarrays could conceivably make a positive difference to implantation rates and reduce miscarriage rates for those who choose to use PGD for this purpose. PGD requires, however, that in vitro fertilisation (IVF) be used to generate embryos for testing. It is therefore unlikely that it will ever be used outside fertility clinics and, even then, only for a subset of clients. Future use remains debatable.

As the cost comes down, microarrray technologies will likely supersede the existing cytogenetic technologies as a first-line prenatal test.

Keywords: Law, Genetics, Ethics, Human Genome, Genes, Microarrays

Suggested Citation

Matthews, Genevieve and Henaghan, Mark, Genetic Testing and Microarray Technologies (May 1, 2011). GENES, SOCIETY AND THE FUTURE, Vol. I, Part 5, Human Genome Research Project, Dunedin, NZ, 2007 . Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1828472

Genevieve Matthews

Law Foundation-sponsored Human Genome Research Project ( email )

Dunedin
New Zealand
6434795324 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www.otago.ac.nz/law/genome

Mark Henaghan (Contact Author)

University of Otago ( email )

Faculty of Law
P.O. Box 56
Dunedin, 9054
New Zealand
64 3 479 5324 (Phone)
64 3 479 8855 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://otago.ac.nz/law/genome

University of Otago ( email )

PO Box 56
Dunedin North
Dunedin, 9016
New Zealand
6434798854 (Phone)
644798855 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://otago.ac.nz/law/genome

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