Musicians Outperform Nonmusicians in Speech
Imitation

Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 4969, pp. 56-73, 2008

18 Pages Posted: 17 May 2011  

Barbara Pastuszek-Lipinska

Adam Mickiewicz University

Date Written: January 1, 2008

Abstract

Recently can be observed a growing interest in the effects of music on humans. Music has been called a food or a multi-sensory fitness of the brain. Many studies have already confirmed that practice and active involvement in music improve spatio-temporal functions, verbal memory, visuo-spatial abilities, reading, self-esteem, and generally cognitive processes. In the present paper, a general overview of research on the influence of music on humans has been provided. Moreover, it has been presented data on a research project, which was conducted with the aim to examine whether music education may be viewed as one of the factors, that improve second language acquisition.

Keywords: musicianship, musical abilities, foreign language acquisition, speech perception, auditory functions, cognition

Suggested Citation

Pastuszek-Lipinska, Barbara, Musicians Outperform Nonmusicians in Speech Imitation (January 1, 2008). Lecture Notes in Computer Science, Vol. 4969, pp. 56-73, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1831232

Barbara Pastuszek-Lipinska (Contact Author)

Adam Mickiewicz University

Al. Niepodległości 4
Poznan, 61-874
Poland

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