Skills & Values: Discovery Practice, Chapter 4: Answers to Interrogatories

In Skills & Values: Discovery Practice, Lexis-Nexis, Reed Elsevier Properties, Inc., and Matthew Bender & Company, Inc., 2011

U Denver Legal Studies Research Paper No. 11-08

10 Pages Posted: 13 May 2011 Last revised: 28 Feb 2015

See all articles by David I. C. Thomson

David I. C. Thomson

University of Denver, Sturm College of Law

Date Written: May 12, 2011

Abstract

Over the last few years, there has been much discussion about the future of legal education. Much of this was set in motion by the Carnegie Report (Educating Lawyers, 2007), which speaks to the fundamental notion that it is better to teach legal doctrine (rules and cases) in context. It argues for something we have known for years: that if we can teach the fundamental aspects of each area of law, and do so (where appropriate) in the way it crosses a lawyers’ desk, our students will not only understand and engage with the material better, they will be more “practice ready” when they graduate. The only problem with that idea - which the Carnegie Report failed to address - is that the materials we have to teach with are not, generally speaking, designed to work in that way.

The Skills & Values Series was designed from the ground up to fill that critical gap, and will eventually be available for most law school courses. This volume in the Series - Discovery Practice - came out of my teaching a course in the law of civil discovery very much in a Carnegie - “doctrine in context” - format, for nearly 20 years. (This paper is Chapter 4 from the book). The design of the course is fairly simple. Throughout the course, students are deeply engaged in doing outside of class what they are learning in class. That means that in between classes, they are engaged in a simulated civil litigation, with students either representing plaintiff or defendant, and assigned in pairs as opposing counsel. As a result of this design, the book material provides an introduction to the topic of the week, and the problem set materials are at the heart of the course. The problem provided with the book (and in the online companion site) allows the teacher to set up a simulated product liability litigation between an injured plaintiff and a defendant drug company. (If you would like more information about the book and online site, contact your Lexis publishing representative).

Suggested Citation

Thomson, David I. C., Skills & Values: Discovery Practice, Chapter 4: Answers to Interrogatories (May 12, 2011). In Skills & Values: Discovery Practice, Lexis-Nexis, Reed Elsevier Properties, Inc., and Matthew Bender & Company, Inc., 2011; U Denver Legal Studies Research Paper No. 11-08. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1839645 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1839645

David I. C. Thomson (Contact Author)

University of Denver, Sturm College of Law ( email )

2255 E. Evans Avenue
Denver, CO 80208
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.law.du.edu/index.php/profile/david-thomson

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