New Evidence on the Determinants of Absenteeism Using Linked Employer-Employee Data

Posted: 14 May 2011  

Georges Dionne

HEC Montreal - Department of Finance

Benoit Dostie

HEC Montreal - Institute of Applied Economics; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Multiple version iconThere are 2 versions of this paper

Date Written: October 1, 2007

Abstract

This paper provides new evidence on the determinants of absenteeism. The authors extend the typical labor-leisure model used to analyze the decision to skip work to include firm-level policy variables relevant to the absenteeism decision and uncertainty about the cost of absenteeism. Estimates based on data from Statistics Canada’s Workplace Employee Survey (1999-2002), with controls for observed and unobserved demographic, job, and firm characteristics (including workplace practices), indicate that work arrangements were important determinants of absence. For example, the authors find strong evidence that standard weekday work hours, work-at-home options, and reduced workweeks were associated with reduced absence, whereas shift work and compressed work weeks were associated with increased absence.

Keywords: absenteeism

JEL Classification: J29, M59

Suggested Citation

Dionne, Georges and Dostie, Benoit, New Evidence on the Determinants of Absenteeism Using Linked Employer-Employee Data (October 1, 2007). Industrial and Labor Relations Review, Vol. 61, No. 1, 2007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1839657

Georges Dionne (Contact Author)

HEC Montreal - Department of Finance ( email )

3000 Chemin de la Cote-Sainte-Catherine
Montreal, Quebec H3T 2A7
Canada
514-340-6596 (Phone)
514-340-5019 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.hec.ca/gestiondesrisques/

Benoit Dostie

HEC Montreal - Institute of Applied Economics ( email )

3000, ch. de la Côte-Ste-Catherine
Montréal, Quebec H3T 2A7
Canada
514-340-6453 (Phone)
514-340-6469 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.hec.ca/profs/benoit.dostie.html

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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