Introduction: Farming the Garden of Eden

Environment and Development Economics, Forthcoming

Posted: 26 May 2011

See all articles by Christopher B. Barrett

Christopher B. Barrett

Cornell University - Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics & Management

Edward B. Barbier

Colorado State University, Fort Collins - Department of Economics

Thomas Reardon

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: 2001

Abstract

The second part of this special issue on agroindustrialization, development and the environment is a policy forum based on an article from The Economist news magazine on the current and prospective environmental pressures induced by changes in agricultural technology. Global demand for food and other agricultural products will inevitably grow considerably over the course of this century, due to growth in both population and incomes. At the same time, farming’s share of the economically active population will fall sharply, necessitating increased commercialization of agriculture so as to increase productivity to meet the growing demands of urban and non-agricultural rural consumers. Yet there is little room to expand agricultural production beyond lands currently cultivated or in pasture without incurring additional economic and environmental costs. Nor is there a great surplus of water with which to irrigate more crops. Meanwhile, current farming practices are leading to alarming rates of soils degradation and inorganic and organic water pollution.

Suggested Citation

Barrett, Christopher B. and Barbier, Edward B. and Reardon, Thomas, Introduction: Farming the Garden of Eden (2001). Environment and Development Economics, Forthcoming. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1847700

Christopher B. Barrett (Contact Author)

Cornell University - Charles H. Dyson School of Applied Economics & Management ( email )

315 Warren Hall
Ithaca, NY 14853-7801
United States
607-255-4489 (Phone)
607-255-9984 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://aem.cornell.edu/faculty_sites/cbb2/

Edward B. Barbier

Colorado State University, Fort Collins - Department of Economics ( email )

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1771
United States

Thomas Reardon

affiliation not provided to SSRN ( email )

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