The Behavior of Innovation: Inside Behavioral Biology and the Innovative Mind

Posted: 25 May 2011

Date Written: May 25, 2011

Abstract

Amongst non-human species, one limitation to innovation is conservatism, or the tendency to avoid novel behaviors related to a familiar object or paradigm. Conservatism has recently been implicated amongst non-human primates in both social conformity and as a potential impediment to insight learning, or the ability to spontaneously solve a novel problem. On the other hand, sometimes relatively simple changes will circumvent this problem. I will discuss both what we know about conservatism in nonhuman primates as well as potential implications for innovation in humans.

Suggested Citation

Brosnan, Sarah F., The Behavior of Innovation: Inside Behavioral Biology and the Innovative Mind (May 25, 2011). Gruter Institute Squaw Valley Conference – Innovation and Economic Growth, 2011, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1851656

Sarah F. Brosnan (Contact Author)

Georgia State University ( email )

Atlanta, GA 30303
United States
4044136301 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://www2.gsu.edu/~wwwcbs/

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