How Chinese Farmers Change Crop Choice to Adapt to Climate Change

Climate Change Economics (CCE), Vol. 1, Issue 3, 2010

Posted: 30 May 2011

See all articles by Jinxia Wang

Jinxia Wang

Chinese Academy of Sciences - Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy

Robert O. Mendelsohn

Yale University - School of Forestry & Environmental Studies; Yale University

Ariel Dinar

University of California, Riverside (UCR)

Jikun Huang

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS)

Date Written: December 1, 2010

Abstract

A multinomial logit model is estimated across the crop choices of a sample of thousands of Chinese farmers. As temperatures warm, farmers are more likely to choose cotton and maize, but less likely to choose soybeans, and vegetables. As precipitation increases, farmers are more likely to choose wheat and less likely to choose vegetables and potatoes. We simulate how crop choice outcomes might change using the empirical results and a set of climate change predictions for 2100. The magnitude of the change is sensitive to the climate scenario and to the seasonal and regional variation of climate change predictions within China.

Keywords: Climate change, crop choice, adaptation, China

Suggested Citation

Wang, Jinxia and Mendelsohn, Robert O. and Dinar, Ariel and Huang, Jikun, How Chinese Farmers Change Crop Choice to Adapt to Climate Change (December 1, 2010). Climate Change Economics (CCE), Vol. 1, Issue 3, 2010. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1854068

Jinxia Wang (Contact Author)

Chinese Academy of Sciences - Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy ( email )

52 Sanlihe Rd.
Datun Road, Anwai
Beijing, Xicheng District 100864
China

Robert O. Mendelsohn

Yale University - School of Forestry & Environmental Studies ( email )

195 Prospect Street
New Haven, CT 06511
United States

Yale University ( email )

New Haven, CT 06520
United States
2034325128 (Phone)

Ariel Dinar

University of California, Riverside (UCR) ( email )

900 University Avenue
Riverside, CA 92521
United States

Jikun Huang

Chinese Academy of Sciences (CAS) ( email )

Center for Chinese Agricultural Policy (CCAP)
No. Jia 11, Datun Road
Anwai, Beijing, 100101
China
+86 10 64889440 (Phone)
+86 10 64856533 (Fax)

HOME PAGE: http://www.ccap.org.cn/english/ccapstaff.asp?PID=1380

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