Measuring the Length of the Chancellor's Foot: Quantifying How Legal Outcomes Depend on the Judges Hearing the Case and Whether Such Variation Can Be Explained by Characteristics of the Judges

35 Pages Posted: 9 Jun 2011

See all articles by Michael Blackwell

Michael Blackwell

London School of Economics - Law Department

Date Written: May 30, 2011

Abstract

This paper considers the extent that judicial decisions are dependent on which judge(s) hears the case and whether any variation in decision making can be attributable to factors associated with the judge(s). This paper addresses these questions, using multi-level modelling, by a statistical analysis of the 1,308 appeals from the Immigration Appeal Tribunal and Employment Appeal Tribunal heard by the Court of Appeal (Civil Division) of England and Wales between 2001 and 2009 assembled by the author for this purpose.

Keywords: court of Appeal (England & Wales), employment, immigration, EAT, IAT, judges, decision-making, multi-level modelling, multiple-membership models, quantitative research methods

JEL Classification: K31, K4, K41

Suggested Citation

Blackwell, Michael, Measuring the Length of the Chancellor's Foot: Quantifying How Legal Outcomes Depend on the Judges Hearing the Case and Whether Such Variation Can Be Explained by Characteristics of the Judges (May 30, 2011). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1855719 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1855719

Michael Blackwell (Contact Author)

London School of Economics - Law Department ( email )

Houghton Street
London WC2A 2AE, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
220
Abstract Views
1,298
rank
142,033
PlumX Metrics