Mega-Events and Sectoral Employment: The Case of the 1996 Olympic Games

48 Pages Posted: 31 Aug 2011

See all articles by Arne Feddersen

Arne Feddersen

Hamburg University of Economics and Politics

Wolfgang Maennig

Universität Hamburg, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences

Date Written: March 2010

Abstract

This paper contributes to the analysis of large sporting events using highly disaggregated data. We use the 1996 Olympic Games in Atlanta, which are also outstanding as one of the very few large sporting events where ex post academic analysis found significant positive effects. This paper extends earlier studies in several ways. First, monthly rather than quarterly data will be employed. Second, the impact of the 1996 Olympics will be analyzed for 16 different sectors or subsectors. Third, in addition to standard DD models, we use a non-parametric approach to flexibly isolate employment effects. Regarding the Olympic effect, hardly any evidence for a persistent shift in the aftermath of or the preparation for the Olympic Games is supported. We find a significant positive employment effect in the monthly employment statistics exclusively during the staging of the Olympic Games (July 1996). These short-term effects are concentrated in the sectors of 'retail trade', 'accommodation and food services', and 'arts, entertainment, and recreation', while other sectors showed no such effects.

Keywords: Olympic Games, economic impact, ex-post analysis, employment, sectoral data

JEL Classification: H54, R12, L83

Suggested Citation

Feddersen, Arne and Maennig, Wolfgang, Mega-Events and Sectoral Employment: The Case of the 1996 Olympic Games (March 2010). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1868805 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1868805

Arne Feddersen

Hamburg University of Economics and Politics ( email )

Von-Melle-Park 9
Hamburg, 20149
Germany

Wolfgang Maennig (Contact Author)

Universität Hamburg, Faculty of Business, Economics and Social Sciences ( email )

Von-Melle-Park 5
Hamburg, 20146
Germany

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