Culture, Development, and Zero-Sum Thought

30 Pages Posted: 27 Jun 2011

Date Written: June, 24 2011

Abstract

Zero-sum thought is believed to vary across collectivist and individualist cultures.

In two studies, we test a model of the origins of cross-cultural differences in zero-sum thought. We examine individuals at four age groups (preschool, early elementary, late elementary, adults) in a collectivist culture, Singapore, and an individualist culture, the United States. Participants predict one vignette character’s state on either the basis of a different character or the same character at a different time. Results indicate early- emerging differences in zero-sum thought that are consistent with previous findings on cultural differences in emotional suppression. Results are discussed in terms of cultural differences in suppression and practical implications.

Suggested Citation

Egan, Louisa and Diermeier, Daniel, Culture, Development, and Zero-Sum Thought (June, 24 2011). IACM 24TH Annual Conference Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1872140 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1872140

Louisa Egan (Contact Author)

Bryn Mawr College ( email )

Bryn Mawr, PA 19010
United States

Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management ( email )

2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States

Daniel Diermeier

Northwestern University - Kellogg School of Management ( email )

2001 Sheridan Road
Evanston, IL 60208
United States

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