Polarized Perceptions, Negative Emotions, and Intergroup Conflict in Europe's Backyard: The Case Study of Crimea

Posted: 27 Jun 2011

Date Written: June, 24 2011

Abstract

Since the demise of the Soviet Union, the Crimean conflict between the three main Crimean political actors, Russians, Ukrainians, and Crimean Tatars, with three clashing ethno-religious worldviews and three competing “national” aspirations, is considered to be one of the most complex territorial conflict in post-Soviet Ukraine. Crimea, home to the Russian Black Sea Fleet, differs from the rest of the Ukraine, because it is the only Ukrainian administrative subdivision with its own constitution and own Upper Parliament, where the ethnic Russians are a majority. Against this turbulent political landscape, this paper first investigates the post-return dynamics of the Crimean Tatars and explores how Crimean Tatar perceptions and emotions impact their collective conflict strategies against the background of relative deprivation. Second part examines the Russian and Ukrainian perceptions and emotions and their socio-political implications vis-à-vis Crimean Tatars. The final part of the paper surveys the ongoing works of third-parties in Crimea, and consequently brings forth a proposal for conflict management based on early warning signs.

Suggested Citation

Izmirli, Idil P., Polarized Perceptions, Negative Emotions, and Intergroup Conflict in Europe's Backyard: The Case Study of Crimea (June, 24 2011). IACM 24TH Annual Conference Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1872167 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1872167

Idil P. Izmirli (Contact Author)

George Mason University ( email )

4400 University Drive
Fairfax, VA 22030
United States

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