Freedom of Expression: Criticizing Public Officials

Amsterdam Law Forum

10 Pages Posted: 1 Jul 2011

See all articles by Re'em Segev

Re'em Segev

Hebrew University of Jerusalem – Faculty of Law

Date Written: 2009

Abstract

In what follows, I summarize an argument against prohibitions on freedom of speech with regard to criticism directed at public officials- namely, every person who has a legal power in an institution of the state, including the legislative branch (particularly parliament member), the judiciary (particularly judges) and the executive branch (including, for example, prosecutes, police officers)- and public institutions (rather than a public official at the institution) and the government in general (rather than a specific institution). Such criticism can include, for example, claims regarding the morality or legality of actions of public officials (for example, a claim that a police officer is corrupt), their qualifications (for example, a claim that a judge is lazy), or the efficiency of a certain institution (for example, the army). I argue that there are strong considerations in favor of criticizing the performance of public officials (and institutions), and especially against legal (and particularly criminal) limitations on such criticism, and relatively weak considerations against this criticism, especially with regard to legal (and particularly criminal) limitations on criticizing public officials.

Suggested Citation

Segev, Re'em, Freedom of Expression: Criticizing Public Officials (2009). Amsterdam Law Forum. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1876366

Re'em Segev (Contact Author)

Hebrew University of Jerusalem – Faculty of Law ( email )

Mount Scopus
Jerusalem, 91905
Israel

HOME PAGE: http://en.law.huji.ac.il/people/reem-segev

Register to save articles to
your library

Register

Paper statistics

Downloads
25
Abstract Views
360
PlumX Metrics