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Debunking Mexican American Apartheid: A Long, Dark Silence of Law, a Brief Shining Moment of Justice

Bilingual Review/Revista Bilingüe, Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 281-287, 2008

7 Pages Posted: 7 Jul 2011  

Rubén G. Rumbaut

University of California, Irvine - Department of Sociology

Date Written: 2008

Abstract

Review of Michael A. Olivas, ed., “Colored Men” and “Hombres Aquí:” Hernández v. Texas and the Rise of Mexican American Lawyering. The focus is on an unlikely civil-rights case, Hernández v. Texas, involving a drunken barroom brawl and a club-footed murder suspect, which in 1954 became the first ever tried by Mexican American lawyers before the U.S. Supreme Court, and the first to open up for persons of Latin American ancestry the equal protection clause of the Fourteenth Amendment to the U.S. Constitution.

Keywords: Hernández v. Texas, Racial Segregation, Jury Selection, Mexican American Lawyers, U.S. Supreme Court, Fourteenth Amendment

Suggested Citation

Rumbaut, Rubén G., Debunking Mexican American Apartheid: A Long, Dark Silence of Law, a Brief Shining Moment of Justice (2008). Bilingual Review/Revista Bilingüe, Vol. 28, No. 3, pp. 281-287, 2008. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1878107

Rubén G. Rumbaut (Contact Author)

University of California, Irvine - Department of Sociology ( email )

3151 Social Sciences Plaza A
Irvine, CA 92697-5100
United States

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