Aboriginal Rights and the Constitution: A Story within a Story?

CANADIAN CONSTITUTIONAL DILEMMAS REVISITED, pp. 131-146, Denis N. Magnusson & Daniel A. Soberman, eds., Institute of Intergovernmental Relations, 1997

17 Pages Posted: 8 Jan 2012

See all articles by Darlene Johnston

Darlene Johnston

University of British Columbia (UBC), Faculty of Law

Date Written: 1997

Abstract

Proponents of group rights generally point to section 35 of Canada's Constitution Act 1982 as the prime example of legal rights being vested explicitly in groups. Section 35 declares that 'the existing aboriginal and treaty rights of the aboriginal peoples of Canada are hereby recognized and affirmed.'

In this paper, the author examines the 1990 Supreme Court of Canada decision in R. v. Sparrow, a leading case on section 35, and its application to a fishing rights case involving her own community, the Nayaashiinigmiing, a reserve belonging to the Saugeen Ojibway Nation.

Keywords: Canada, Aboriginal rights, constitutional law

Suggested Citation

Johnston, Darlene, Aboriginal Rights and the Constitution: A Story within a Story? (1997). CANADIAN CONSTITUTIONAL DILEMMAS REVISITED, pp. 131-146, Denis N. Magnusson & Daniel A. Soberman, eds., Institute of Intergovernmental Relations, 1997. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1879516

Darlene Johnston (Contact Author)

University of British Columbia (UBC), Faculty of Law ( email )

1822 East Mall
Lower Mall Research Station Annex
Vancouver, British Columbia V6T 1Z1
Canada
604.822.9517 (Phone)

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