Going Outside the Law: The Role of the State in Forming Attitudes to Extralegal Violence

52 Pages Posted: 7 Jul 2011

See all articles by Aziz Z. Huq

Aziz Z. Huq

University of Chicago - Law School

Tom Tyler

Yale University - Law School

Jonathan Jackson

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Methodology

Ben Bradford

University College London - Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science

Date Written: July 6, 2011

Abstract

This article examines the circumstances in which individual members of ethnic and racial minority communities believe it is acceptable to go outside the law by resorting to violence. Analyzing the attitudes of a random sample of young British men who belong to racial minorities, we study attitudes towards two forms of violence. We address attitudes to violence as a form of social control and attitudes to violence as a tool for social change, e.g., through violent protests or through terrorism. Although both forms of violence are matters of ongoing concern, the influence of the state - and particularly the behavior and legitimacy of the police and the state - upon public attitudes to violence is poorly understood. We reject the hypothesis that attitudes to violence are solely products of individual psychology, social class, or immediate circumstances. We argue that the legitimacy of the state and its agents influences both attitudes to violence as a form of social control and attitudes to violence as a tool for social change. A “procedural justice” model used previously to predict cooperative and compliance behavior of the public may therefore have a larger range of applications.

Keywords: Violence, policing, procedural justice, terrorism

Suggested Citation

Huq, Aziz Z. and Tyler, Tom and Jackson, Jonathan and Bradford, Ben, Going Outside the Law: The Role of the State in Forming Attitudes to Extralegal Violence (July 6, 2011). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1879976 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1879976

Aziz Z. Huq (Contact Author)

University of Chicago - Law School ( email )

1111 E. 60th St.
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

Tom Tyler

Yale University - Law School ( email )

P.O. Box 208215
New Haven, CT 06520-8215
United States

Jonathan Jackson

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) - Department of Methodology ( email )

Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom
+0044-207-955-7652 (Phone)

Ben Bradford

University College London - Jill Dando Institute of Security and Crime Science ( email )

35 Tavistock Square
London, WC1H 9EZ
United Kingdom

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