The Case for De-Criminalizing Blackmail: A Reply to Lindgren and Campbell

Western State University Law Review, Vol. 24, No. 2, 1997

12 Pages Posted: 14 Jul 2011

See all articles by Walter E. Block

Walter E. Block

Loyola University New Orleans - Joseph A. Butt, S.J. College of Business

Date Written: July 13, 2011

Abstract

The argument for legalizing blackmail is simple and straightforward. Blackmail consists of a threat or menace, coupled with a demand for money or other valuable consideration. The threat, however, consists of something the blackmailer has every right to do. For example, it is entirely legal to engage in malicious gossip, or write a negative movie review, expose past criminal behavior, or refuse to befriend a person. How, then, can it be illegal to threaten to do something, when to actually engage in the activity would be legal?

Suggested Citation

Block, Walter E., The Case for De-Criminalizing Blackmail: A Reply to Lindgren and Campbell (July 13, 2011). Western State University Law Review, Vol. 24, No. 2, 1997. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1885195

Walter E. Block (Contact Author)

Loyola University New Orleans - Joseph A. Butt, S.J. College of Business ( email )

6363 St. Charles Avenue
Box 15, Miller 321
New Orleans, LA 70118
United States
(504) 864-7944 (Phone)
(504) 864-7970 (Fax)

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