Developing a Skills-Based Agenda for 'New Human Capital' Research

6 Pages Posted: 12 Aug 2011

See all articles by Eric A. Hanushek

Eric A. Hanushek

Stanford University - Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Date Written: 2010

Abstract

Recent research establishes the need for a new research agenda related to the production and impact of human capital. Driven largely by data availability, analysis focused on human capital investments is frequently reduced to the study of school attainment. The central element of an expanded agenda is the identification and incorporation of different dimensions of skills - including new study into underlying measurement issues surrounding cognitive and noncognitive skills. Investigations of individual and aggregate outcomes now show that the measurement issues surrounding skills are very important. Moreover, these findings implicitly open questions about the integration of studies of the determinants of skills with those of the impacts of skills, because skill formation is known to involve more than just time in schools. Modern research also suggests a necessity of revisiting a variety of analyses in terms of causal claims and the implications of findings for policy issues. Newly available administrative data provide a means of tracing the development of skills through entire school careers and into later outcomes. And the upsurge of newly minted researchers in the area makes this a propitious research investment.

Suggested Citation

Hanushek, Eric A., Developing a Skills-Based Agenda for 'New Human Capital' Research (2010). American Economic Association, Ten Years and Beyond: Economists Answer NSF's Call for Long-Term Research Agendas. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1889200 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1889200

Eric A. Hanushek (Contact Author)

Stanford University - Hoover Institution on War, Revolution and Peace ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305-6010
United States
650-736-0942 (Phone)
650-723-1687 (Fax)

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER)

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

CESifo (Center for Economic Studies and Ifo Institute)

Poschinger Str. 5
Munich, DE-81679
Germany

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