The Economic Impact of Social Ties: Evidence from German Reunification

59 Pages Posted: 20 Jul 2011

See all articles by Konrad Burchardi

Konrad Burchardi

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE)

Tarek A. Hassan

University of Chicago - Booth School of Business; National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER); Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR)

Multiple version iconThere are 4 versions of this paper

Date Written: July 2011

Abstract

We use the fall of the Berlin Wall in 1989 to identify a causal effect of social ties on regional economic growth. We show that households who have social ties to East Germany in 1989 experience a persistent rise in their personal incomes after the fall of the Berlin Wall. Moreover, the presence of these households significantly affects economic performance at the regional level: it increases the returns to entrepreneurial activity, the share of households who become entrepreneurs, and the likelihood that firms based within a given West German region invest in East Germany. As a result, West German regions which (for idiosyncratic reasons) have a high concentration of households with social ties to the East exhibit substantially higher growth in income per capita in the early 1990s. A one standard deviation rise in the share of households with social ties to East Germany in 1989 is associated with a 4.6 percentage point rise in income per capita over six years. We interpret our findings as evidence that social ties between individuals can indeed facilitate economic growth.

Keywords: economic development, German Reunification, migration, networks, social ties

JEL Classification: J61, L14, O11

Suggested Citation

Burchardi, Konrad and Hassan, Tarek Alexander, The Economic Impact of Social Ties: Evidence from German Reunification (July 2011). CEPR Discussion Paper No. DP8470. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1889993

Konrad Burchardi (Contact Author)

London School of Economics & Political Science (LSE) ( email )

Houghton Street
London, WC2A 2AE
United Kingdom

Tarek Alexander Hassan

University of Chicago - Booth School of Business ( email )

5807 S. Woodlawn Avenue
Chicago, IL 60637
United States

HOME PAGE: http://faculty.chicagobooth.edu/tarek.hassan/index.html

National Bureau of Economic Research (NBER) ( email )

1050 Massachusetts Avenue
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States

Centre for Economic Policy Research (CEPR) ( email )

London
United Kingdom

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