Explicit and Implicit Racial Attitudes: A Test of their Convergent and Predictive Validity

41 Pages Posted: 1 Aug 2011 Last revised: 19 Aug 2011

Shanto Iyengar

Stanford University - Department of Communication

Solomon Messing

Stanford University - Department of Communication

Kyu S. Hahn

Seoul National University

Date Written: 2011

Abstract

Using data from national samples, we examine the convergent and predictive validity of explicit and implicit measures of racial prejudice. First, we show that explicit measures diverge from a measure of implicit racial bias. The number of respondents classified as prejudiced on the implicit measure substantially exceeds the corresponding number based on explicit indicators, suggesting that survey respondents may be masking their racial attitudes. Second, in three different experimental contexts, we demonstrate that implicit racial bias predicts a preference for individuals with lighter complexions. People classified as prejudiced on the basis of explicit measures, however, do not discriminate on the basis of complexion. Our findings suggest that future efforts to assess prejudice should incorporate both implicit and explicit racial attitudes.

Suggested Citation

Iyengar, Shanto and Messing, Solomon and Hahn, Kyu S., Explicit and Implicit Racial Attitudes: A Test of their Convergent and Predictive Validity (2011). APSA 2011 Annual Meeting Paper. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1901991

Shanto Iyengar (Contact Author)

Stanford University - Department of Communication ( email )

CA
United States
650-723-5509 (Phone)
650-723-6933 (Fax)

Solomon Messing

Stanford University - Department of Communication ( email )

Stanford, CA 94305-2050
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.stanford.edu/~messing

Kyu S. Hahn

Seoul National University ( email )

Kwanak-gu
Seoul, 151-742
Korea, Republic of (South Korea)

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