Echoes of Colonial Repression: The Long-Term Effects of the 1947 Revolt upon Political Attitudes in Madagascar

Posted: 1 Aug 2011 Last revised: 16 Aug 2013

Date Written: 2011

Abstract

The repression of the 1947 Madagascar revolt has been regarded as one of the bloodiest episodes in the history of Colonial Africa. While some historians and anthropologists claim the brutality of this event has traumatized the population in significant ways, no systematic evidence has been provided to date to support these hypotheses. In this article, we undertake an empirical strategy that combines recent individual-level survey data with geographic and ethnographic information about the rebellion to estimate the long-term effects of this event upon current self-reported levels of freedom of expression. Applying two different matching methods and a regression discontinuity design that exploits plausible exogenous variation in exposure to the rebellion generated by a mountain range, we find a negative treatment effect. The results are robust to controls for individual characteristics and a host of district-level variables such as rainfall, temperature, elevation, land area, and distance to the nearest industrial town.

Keywords: Historical Legacies, Colonialism, Political Behavior, African Politics

Suggested Citation

Garcia Ponce, Omar and Wantchekon, Leonard, Echoes of Colonial Repression: The Long-Term Effects of the 1947 Revolt upon Political Attitudes in Madagascar (2011). APSA 2011 Annual Meeting Paper, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1903315

Omar Garcia Ponce (Contact Author)

New York University (NYU) ( email )

Bobst Library, E-resource Acquisitions
20 Cooper Square 3rd Floor
New York, NY 10003-711
United States

Leonard Wantchekon

Princeton University ( email )

22 Chambers Street
Princeton, NJ 08544-0708
United States

Do you have a job opening that you would like to promote on SSRN?

Paper statistics

Abstract Views
1,583
PlumX Metrics