Hedging Your Bets: Uncertainty About Continued Success Reduces People's Desire for High Procedural Fairness

57 Pages Posted: 23 Aug 2011

See all articles by Joel Brockner

Joel Brockner

Columbia Business School

Batia Wiesenfeld

New York University (NYU) - Leonard N. Stern School of Business; New York University (NYU) - Department of Management and Organizational Behavior

Phyllis Siegel

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Rutgers Business School at Newark & New Brunswick

Shu Zhang

Columbia University - Columbia Business School

Abstract

A central tenet of organizational justice theory is that people prefer decisions to be made with higher than with lower procedural fairness. The results of five studies unearthed a boundary condition for this general tendency. People who experienced non-contingent success had less of a desire to be treated with higher procedural fairness relative to their counterparts who experienced contingent success. Furthermore, four of the five studies examined moderating influences on the relationship between success contingency and fairness preferences and found, as predicted, that the relationship was stronger when people were more motivated to protect against threats to the self.

Suggested Citation

Brockner, Joel and Wiesenfeld, Batia and Siegel, Phyllis and Zhang, Shu, Hedging Your Bets: Uncertainty About Continued Success Reduces People's Desire for High Procedural Fairness. Columbia Business School Research Paper No. 11-7, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1912051 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1912051

Joel Brockner (Contact Author)

Columbia Business School ( email )

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Batia Wiesenfeld

New York University (NYU) - Leonard N. Stern School of Business ( email )

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Suite 9-160
New York, NY NY 10012
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New York University (NYU) - Department of Management and Organizational Behavior ( email )

44 West 4th Street
New York, NY 10012
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Phyllis Siegel

Rutgers, The State University of New Jersey - Rutgers Business School at Newark & New Brunswick ( email )

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94 Rockafeller Road
Piscataway, NJ 08854-8054
United States

Shu Zhang

Columbia University - Columbia Business School ( email )

3022 Broadway
New York, NY 10027
United States

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