Health Behavior in Developing Countries

Posted: 31 Aug 2011

See all articles by Pascaline Dupas

Pascaline Dupas

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Department of Economics

Date Written: September 2011

Abstract

The disease burden in low-income countries is extremely high. Malaria, respiratory infections, diarrhea, AIDS, and other diseases are estimated to kill more than 15 million people each year, most of them children. Yet the great majority of these diseases can be prevented or treated. This article reviews microeconomic studies of health-seeking behavior in low-income countries. Factors examined include information, peers, liquidity constraints, and nonrational preferences, such as present bias. I then discuss the implications for policy, including the scope for mandates, subsidies, and incentives.

Suggested Citation

Dupas, Pascaline, Health Behavior in Developing Countries (September 2011). Annual Review of Economics, Vol. 3, pp. 425-449, 2011. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1920107 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-economics-111809-125029

Pascaline Dupas (Contact Author)

University of California, Los Angeles (UCLA) - Department of Economics ( email )

Box 951477
Los Angeles, CA 90095-1477
United States

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