Jasmine Revolutions

29 Pages Posted: 6 Sep 2011 Last revised: 11 Sep 2014

See all articles by Anupam Chander

Anupam Chander

University of California, Davis - School of Law

Date Written: September 6, 2011

Abstract

Will the Internet help topple tyrants, or will it help further cement their control? Prominent skeptics challenge the notion that the Internet will help rid the world of dictators. They suggest that the Internet will simply serve as a new opiate of the masses, or worse, will assist autocrats in manipulating popular opinion. I defend the liberalizing promise of cyberspace. Where others have set out the value of the Internet to dissidents, I answer the main critiques of that position - that Internet activism is futile, that the Internet is simply the new opiate of the masses, and that autocrats will benefit more from the Internet than dissidents. I argue that dictators have revealed their own appraisals of the Internet: when threatened, they shut it down. Tyrants today fear the Internet more than they benefit from it. This summer’s events again confirmed this truth: On the day when the rebels marched into Tripoli, they restored Libya to the Internet.

Keywords: Jasmine Revolution, Internet, Democracy, revolution, authoritarianism, totalitarianism, tyranny

Suggested Citation

Chander, Anupam, Jasmine Revolutions (September 6, 2011). Cornell Law Review, Vol. 97, 2012 ; UC Davis Legal Studies Research Paper No. 272. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1923280

Anupam Chander (Contact Author)

University of California, Davis - School of Law ( email )

400 Mrak Hall Drive
Davis, CA 95616-5201
United States
530-754-5304 (Phone)
530-754-5311 (Fax)

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