Abstract

http://ssrn.com/abstract=1926349
 
 

References (25)



 
 

Citations (1)



 


 



The Drama! Teen Conflict, Gossip, and Bullying in Networked Publics


Alice E. Marwick


Microsoft Corporation - Microsoft Research New England; Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society

danah boyd


Microsoft Research; New York University (NYU) - Department of Media, Culture, and Communication; University of New South Wales (UNSW); Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society

September 12, 2011

A Decade in Internet Time: Symposium on the Dynamics of the Internet and Society, September 2011

Abstract:     
While teenage conflict is nothing new, today’s gossip, jokes, and arguments often play out through social media like Formspring, Twitter, and Facebook. Although adults often refer to these practices with the language of “bullying,” teens are more likely to refer to the resultant skirmishes and their digital traces as “drama.” Drama is a performative set of actions distinct from bullying, gossip, and relational aggression, incorporating elements of them but also operating quite distinctly. While drama is not particularly new, networked dynamics reconfigure how drama plays out and what it means to teens in new ways. In this paper, we examine how American teens conceptualize drama, its key components, participant motivations for engaging in it, and its relationship to networked technologies. Drawing on six years of ethnographic fieldwork, we examine what drama means to teenagers and its relationship to visibility and privacy. We argue that the emic use of “drama” allows teens to distance themselves from practices which adults may conceptualize as bullying. As such, they can retain agency - and save face - rather than positioning themselves in a victim narrative. Drama is a gendered process that perpetrates conventional gender norms. It also reflects discourses of celebrity, particularly the mundane interpersonal conflict found on soap operas and reality television. For teens, sites like Facebook allow for similar performances in front of engaged audiences. Understanding how “drama” operates is necessary to recognize teens’ own defenses against the realities of aggression, gossip, and bullying in networked publics.

Number of Pages in PDF File: 25

Keywords: drama, bullying, gender, internet, aggression, teens, youth

Accepted Paper Series


Download This Paper

Date posted: September 13, 2011  

Suggested Citation

Marwick, Alice E. and boyd, danah, The Drama! Teen Conflict, Gossip, and Bullying in Networked Publics (September 12, 2011). A Decade in Internet Time: Symposium on the Dynamics of the Internet and Society, September 2011. Available at SSRN: http://ssrn.com/abstract=1926349

Contact Information

Alice E. Marwick
Microsoft Corporation - Microsoft Research New England ( email )
One Memorial Drive, 12th Floor
Cambridge, MA 02142
United States
Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society ( email )
Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Danah Boyd (Contact Author)
Microsoft Research ( email )
One Memorial Drive, 12th Floor
Cambridge, MA 02142
United States
HOME PAGE: http://research.microsoft.com/
New York University (NYU) - Department of Media, Culture, and Communication ( email )
239 Greene St., 7th Floor
New York, NY 10003-1836
United States
University of New South Wales (UNSW)
Sydney, NSW 2052
Australia
Harvard University - Berkman Center for Internet & Society
Harvard Law School
23 Everett, 2nd Floor
Cambridge, MA 02138
United States
Feedback to SSRN


Paper statistics
Abstract Views: 29,667
Downloads: 4,598
Download Rank: 763
References:  25
Citations:  1
Paper comments
No comments have been made on this paper

© 2014 Social Science Electronic Publishing, Inc. All Rights Reserved.  FAQ   Terms of Use   Privacy Policy   Copyright   Contact Us
This page was processed by apollo3 in 0.594 seconds