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A Home of its Own: The Role of Poverty Law in Furthering Law Schools' Missions

46 Pages Posted: 5 Nov 2011  

Marie A. Failinger

Mitchell Hamline School of Law

Date Written: January 1, 2007

Abstract

This author argues that poverty advocates who are willing to carefully attend to their law school’s mission and vision, and to give careful thought to how poverty law may play an important role in achieving that vision, may win a more lasting place for poverty law in the curriculum than it has heretofore managed to achieve in most law schools. This article will argue that poverty law can be a key piece in the curriculum of law schools who define their mission, at least in part, as educating lawyers according to one of five paradigms: 1) lawyers as public citizens and leaders, 2) lawyers as skilled technicians of the law, 3) lawyers as skilled counselors, 4) lawyers as advocates on behalf of a cause in legal institutions, and 5) lawyers as transformational partners with the poor.

Keywords: poverty law, legal education, mainstream academy, law school curriculum, Civil Gideon

Suggested Citation

Failinger, Marie A., A Home of its Own: The Role of Poverty Law in Furthering Law Schools' Missions (January 1, 2007). Fordham Urban Law Journal, Vol. 34, p. 1173, 2007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1929479

Marie A. Failinger (Contact Author)

Mitchell Hamline School of Law ( email )

875 Summit Ave
St. Paul, MN 55105-3076
United States

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