Monica Lewinsky, Impeachment, and the Death of the Independent Counsel Law: What Congress Can Salvage from the Wreckage - A Minimalist View

53 Pages Posted: 19 Sep 2011

See all articles by Ken Gormley

Ken Gormley

Duquesne University - School of Law

Date Written: 2001

Abstract

As the author of the biography of the first Watergate Special Prosecutor, I was an unabashed supporter of the independent counsel law. One of the tangible, concrete monuments of Watergate-era reform, the independent counsel statute was constructed in direct response to the firing of Archibald Cox by President Richard M. Nixon during the infamous “Saturday Night Massacre.” Cox’s job was stripped away by Nixon in October 1973, in a last-ditch effort to save Nixon’s scandal-ridden presidency. Five years later, after a swarm of congressional witnesses and exhaustive legislative deliberations, a special prosecutor law emerged as an integral part of the Ethics in Government Act. In October 1978, a highly optimistic President Jimmy Carter signed the Act into law.

Suggested Citation

Gormley, Kenneth G., Monica Lewinsky, Impeachment, and the Death of the Independent Counsel Law: What Congress Can Salvage from the Wreckage - A Minimalist View (2001). Maryland Law Review, Vol. 60, p. 97, 2001, Duquesne University School of Law Research Paper No. 2011-08, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1930411

Kenneth G. Gormley (Contact Author)

Duquesne University - School of Law ( email )

600 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15282
United States

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