Federalism

R. E. Goodin, P. Pettit, T. Pogge, A COMPANION TO CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, Oxford, Blackwell, 2007

14 Pages Posted: 21 Sep 2011

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Date Written: 2007

Abstract

Federalism has received more philosophical attention recently, partly due to renewed political interest in federalism and its dilemmas and opportunities in Canada, Australia and Europe, where federal arrangements are seen as interesting solution to accommodating differences among populations divided by ethnic or cultural cleavages yet seeking a common political order. Recent empirical research on the requisite and legitimate basis for stability and trust among citizens in federations has also spurred philosophical study.

Federalism is the theory or advocacy of federal political orders, where citizens have political obligations to two authorities whose powers are constitutionally divided, so that the territorial sub-units and a center can each act independently of the others in some area. The sub-units may also participate in central decision-making bodies. The allocation of authority between the sub-units and center may vary; typically the center has powers regarding defense and foreign policy.

Suggested Citation

Follesdal, Andreas, Federalism (2007). R. E. Goodin, P. Pettit, T. Pogge, A COMPANION TO CONTEMPORARY POLITICAL PHILOSOPHY, Oxford, Blackwell, 2007. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1931487

Andreas Follesdal (Contact Author)

Pluricourts ( email )

P.O. Box 6706
St. Olavs plass 5
0130 Oslo
Norway

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