What's Really Wrong with the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania

Duquesne Law Review, Vol. 32, No. 3, 1994

Duquesne University School of Law Research Paper No. 2011-15

52 Pages Posted: 23 Sep 2011

See all articles by Bruce Ledewitz

Bruce Ledewitz

Duquesne University - School of Law

Date Written: September 23, 2011

Abstract

In the midst of criminal indictment, allegations of judicial corruption, charges of nepotism and cronyism, and disputes over secret budgets, the question remains, aside from all that, how well does the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania do its job? The justice exercise their most important and independent authority in the area of institutional relations among the branches of Pennsylvania government. In this field, where their powers are greatest, the justices consistently overstep reasonable boundaries of their powers. Of course, critics always say that courts are too activist. The Pennsylvania situation is unique, however, because the justices are not acting to protect powerless minorities or fundamental rights, but instead, are maintaining and expanding their own influence and prerogatives. What is really wrong with the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania is the lack of a genuine sense of judicial restraint and modest institutional role.

Suggested Citation

Ledewitz, Bruce, What's Really Wrong with the Supreme Court of Pennsylvania (September 23, 2011). Duquesne Law Review, Vol. 32, No. 3, 1994; Duquesne University School of Law Research Paper No. 2011-15. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1932193

Bruce Ledewitz (Contact Author)

Duquesne University - School of Law ( email )

600 Forbes Avenue
Pittsburgh, PA 15282
United States

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