The Recrudescence of Property Rights as the Foremost Principle of Civil Liberties: The First Decade of the Burger Court

18 Pages Posted: 24 Sep 2011 Last revised: 29 Dec 2014

See all articles by William W. Van Alstyne

William W. Van Alstyne

Duke University School of Law; William & Mary Law School

Date Written: 1980

Abstract

In an effort to summarize the first decade of the Burger Court, the greatest single distinguishing fact separating this Court from its predecessors revolves around how the Court treats the notion of liberty. While the Burger Court has not drastically departed from the Warren Courts concept of liberty, the focus of liberty rights has shifted from the protection of personal choice to the protection of personal property.

Keywords: liberty, Burger, Warren

Suggested Citation

Van Alstyne, William W. and Van Alstyne, William W., The Recrudescence of Property Rights as the Foremost Principle of Civil Liberties: The First Decade of the Burger Court (1980). Law and Contemporary Problems, Vol. 43, p. 66, 1980, William & Mary Law School Research Paper No. 09-159, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1932389

William W. Van Alstyne (Contact Author)

William & Mary Law School ( email )

South Henry Street
P.O. Box 8795
Williamsburg, VA 23187-8795
United States

Duke University School of Law ( email )

210 Science Drive
Box 90362
Durham, NC 27708
United States

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