Functional, Overlapping, Competing Jurisdictions Among Fractionalized Agents: Medieval Spain

24 Pages Posted: 4 Oct 2011 Last revised: 26 Oct 2011

See all articles by Daniel J. Smith

Daniel J. Smith

Political Economy Research Institute and Department of Economics and Finance at Middle Tennessee State University

Date Written: October 3, 2011

Abstract

Most economists doubt the operability of functional, overlapping, competing jurisdictions (FOCJ) among large groups of homogenous agents; few could be found that would hold that FOCJ would work among large groups of socially distant agents. Yet, it is under precisely those circumstances that FOCJ would offer the most benefit, allowing socially distant agents to use their own legal courts, judged according to their own law, to minimize confrontations with other groups. This paper argues that FOCJ can be used to facilitate exchange and foster quality institutions and cordially relations among large groups of socially distant agents. Medieval Spain, where Christians, Jews and Muslims resided in close proximity from approximately 711-1492 is used to provide evidence of such a system in practice.

Keywords: FOCJ, Ethno-Linguistic Fractionalization, Legal Systems

JEL Classification: B52, K20, K40

Suggested Citation

Smith, Daniel J., Functional, Overlapping, Competing Jurisdictions Among Fractionalized Agents: Medieval Spain (October 3, 2011). Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1937955 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1937955

Daniel J. Smith (Contact Author)

Political Economy Research Institute and Department of Economics and Finance at Middle Tennessee State University ( email )

MTSU Box 190
1301 E. Main St.
Murfreesboro, TN 37132-0001
United States

HOME PAGE: http://www.danieljosephsmith.com/

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