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Aerosol Impacts on Climate and Biogeochemistry

Posted: 5 Nov 2011  

Natalie Mahowald

Cornell University

Daniel Ward

Cornell University

Silvia Kloster

Max Planck Society for the Advancement of the Sciences - Max Planck Institute for Meteorology

Mark G. Flanner

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

Colette L. Heald

Colorado State University, Fort Collins

Nicholas Heavens

Cornell University

Peter Hess

Cornell University

Jean-Francois Lamarque

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

Patrick Chuang

University of California, Santa Cruz

Date Written: November 2011

Abstract

Aerosols are suspensions of solid and/or liquid particles in the atmosphere and modify atmospheric radiative fluxes and chemistry. Aerosols move mass from one part of the earth system to other parts of the earth system, thereby modifying biogeochemistry and the snow surface albedo. This paper reviews our understanding of the impacts of aerosols on climate through direct radiative changes, aerosol-cloud interactions (indirect effects), atmospheric chemistry, snow albedo, and land and ocean biogeochemistry. Aerosols play an important role in the preindustrial (natural) climate system and have been perturbed substantially over the anthropocene, often directly by human activity. The most important impacts of aerosols, in terms of climate forcing, are from the direct and indirect effects, with large uncertainties. Similarly large impacts of aerosols on land and ocean biogeochemistry have been estimated, but these have larger uncertainties.

Suggested Citation

Mahowald, Natalie and Ward, Daniel and Kloster, Silvia and Flanner, Mark G. and Heald, Colette L. and Heavens, Nicholas and Hess, Peter and Lamarque, Jean-Francois and Chuang, Patrick, Aerosol Impacts on Climate and Biogeochemistry (November 2011). Annual Review of Environment and Resources, Vol. 36, pp. 45-74, 2011. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1955071 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1146/annurev-environ-042009-094507

Natalie Mahowald (Contact Author)

Cornell University

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Daniel Ward

Cornell University

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Silvia Kloster

Max Planck Society for the Advancement of the Sciences - Max Planck Institute for Meteorology

Bundesstra_e 55
20146 Hamburg
Germany

Mark G. Flanner

University of Michigan at Ann Arbor

500 S. State Street
Ann Arbor, MI 48109
United States

Colette L. Heald

Colorado State University, Fort Collins

Fort Collins, CO 80523-1771
United States

Nicholas Heavens

Cornell University

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Peter Hess

Cornell University

Ithaca, NY 14853
United States

Jean-Francois Lamarque

National Center for Atmospheric Research (NCAR)

Boulder, CO 80307
United States

Patrick Chuang

University of California, Santa Cruz

1156 High St
Santa Cruz, CA 95064
United States

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