Selection Practices in Canadian Firms: An Empirical Investigation

3 Pages Posted: 16 Nov 2011

See all articles by Sara L. Mann

Sara L. Mann

University of Guelph - Department of Business

James Chowhan

McMaster University

Date Written: December 2011

Abstract

Using 7 years of data from Statistics Canada's Workplace and Employee Survey, this study examined the types of selection tools used with 23,639 employees in 6,693 Canadian firms. While 79% of these employees were given an interview during the selection process, only 10% were given a test on job‐related knowledge and 9% were given a personality test. Using logit analysis, job‐ and organization‐level variables were examined as predictors of the type of selection tools used. The size of the organization, an in‐house human resource department, the presence of a union and occupation were significant predictors of the use of a test on job‐related knowledge in the selection process. The implications and plausible explanations of this theory to practice gap are discussed.

Suggested Citation

Mann, Sara L. and Chowhan, James, Selection Practices in Canadian Firms: An Empirical Investigation (December 2011). International Journal of Selection and Assessment, Vol. 19, No. 4, December 2011, Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1960406 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1468-2389.2011.00571.x

Sara L. Mann (Contact Author)

University of Guelph - Department of Business ( email )

50 Stone Road East
Guelph, Ontario N1G 2W1
Canada

James Chowhan

McMaster University ( email )

1280 Main St. W.
Hamilton, Ontario L8S4L6
Canada

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