Population Growth in High‐Amenity Nonmetropolitan Areas: What'S the Prognosis?

17 Pages Posted: 29 Nov 2011

See all articles by Dan S. Rickman

Dan S. Rickman

Oklahoma State University - Stillwater - Department of Economics & Legal Studies in Business

Shane D. Rickman

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Date Written: December 2011

Abstract

This paper examines the continued strong population growth in U.S. nonmetropolitan areas possessing high levels of natural amenities during the 1990s and the reasons for near convergence of growth across the top tiers of the amenity hierarchy. Based on estimated parsimonious spatial hedonic growth regressions, strong demand for high‐amenity areas continued in the 1990s, but the converging of population growth across the top tiers appeared related to capitalization of amenity differences among the tiers into factor prices. Yet, evidence obtained from controlling for spatial effects suggests that the relative quality of life in the top two tiers had deteriorated.

Suggested Citation

Rickman, Dan S. and Rickman, Shane D., Population Growth in High‐Amenity Nonmetropolitan Areas: What'S the Prognosis? (December 2011). Journal of Regional Science, Vol. 51, Issue 5, pp. 863-879, 2011. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1965904 or http://dx.doi.org/10.1111/j.1467-9787.2011.00734.x

Dan S. Rickman (Contact Author)

Oklahoma State University - Stillwater - Department of Economics & Legal Studies in Business ( email )

201 Business Building
Stillwater, OK 74078-0555
United States

Shane D. Rickman

affiliation not provided to SSRN

No Address Available

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