Other Grounds for Excluding Criminal Responsibility

THE ROME STATUTE OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT: A COMMENTARY, Vol. 1, pp. 1003-1048, Antonio Cassese, Paola Gaeta, John R. W. D. Jones, eds., Oxford, 2002

47 Pages Posted: 14 Dec 2011

See all articles by Kai Ambos

Kai Ambos

University of Goettingen (Gottingen)

Date Written: 2002

Abstract

Article 31 recognizes four substantive grounds for excluding criminal responsibility: mental disease or defect, intoxication, self-defense, and duress/necessity. For the purpose of this paper mental disease or defect and intoxication will be discussed jointly. The paper focuses primarily on duress/necessity, since these defenses are most important from a practical point of view. They are treated together since Article 31(1)(d) - although referring exclusively to ‘duress’ - offers a kind of mixed solution containing elements of both defenses.

Suggested Citation

Ambos, Kai, Other Grounds for Excluding Criminal Responsibility (2002). THE ROME STATUTE OF THE INTERNATIONAL CRIMINAL COURT: A COMMENTARY, Vol. 1, pp. 1003-1048, Antonio Cassese, Paola Gaeta, John R. W. D. Jones, eds., Oxford, 2002. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1972190 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1972190

Kai Ambos (Contact Author)

University of Goettingen (Gottingen) ( email )

Platz der Göttinger Sieben 5
Göttingen, 37073
Germany

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