Employee Monitoring: Evaluative Surveillance v. Privacy

Business Ethics Quarterly, Vol. 10, pp. 697-709, July 2000

13 Pages Posted: 17 Dec 2011 Last revised: 6 Mar 2018

See all articles by Adam D. Moore

Adam D. Moore

University of Washington - The Information School

Date Written: December 15, 2011

Abstract

In this paper I will address the tension between evaluative surveillance and privacy against the backdrop of the current explosion of information technology. More specifically, and after a brief analysis and justification of privacy rights, I will argue that knowledge of the different kinds of surveillance used at any given company should be made explicit to the employees. Moreover, there will be certain kinds of evaluative monitoring that violate privacy rights and should not be used in most cases. As we shall see, certain jobs may warrant a smaller domain of privacy. We should not conclude, however, that the arguments used in these cases are easily generalized.

Suggested Citation

Moore, Adam D., Employee Monitoring: Evaluative Surveillance v. Privacy (December 15, 2011). Business Ethics Quarterly, Vol. 10, pp. 697-709, July 2000. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1973423 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1973423

Adam D. Moore (Contact Author)

University of Washington - The Information School ( email )

Box 352840
Mary Gates Hall, Ste. 370
Seattle, WA 98195
206.685.9937 (Phone)

HOME PAGE: http://ischool.uw.edu

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