The Sources of Gender Differences in Rates of Job Dismissal

48 Pages Posted: 21 Dec 2011

See all articles by R Wilkins

R Wilkins

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Mark Wooden

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research; IZA Institute of Labor Economics

Date Written: December 2011

Abstract

Empirical studies, especially in the US and UK, have consistently reported that rates of involuntary job separation, or dismissal, are significantly lower among female employees than among males. Only rarely, however, have the reasons for this differential been the subject of detailed investigation. In this paper household panel survey data from Australia are used that also find higher dismissal rates among men than among women. This differential, however, largely disappears once controls for industry and occupation are included. These findings suggest that the observed gender differential primarily reflects systematic differences in the types of jobs into which men and women select.

Keywords: Dismissals, gender differentials, involuntary job separations, HILDA Survey

JEL Classification: J16, J63, J71

Suggested Citation

Wilkins, Roger and Wooden, Mark, The Sources of Gender Differences in Rates of Job Dismissal (December 2011). Melbourne Institute Working Paper No. 27/11. Available at SSRN: https://ssrn.com/abstract=1974748 or http://dx.doi.org/10.2139/ssrn.1974748

Roger Wilkins (Contact Author)

affiliation not provided to SSRN

Mark Wooden

University of Melbourne - Melbourne Institute of Applied Economic and Social Research ( email )

Level 5, FBE Building, 111 Barry Street
Parkville, Victoria 3010
Australia

IZA Institute of Labor Economics

P.O. Box 7240
Bonn, D-53072
Germany

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